M9

Hopefully from this chapter as well as from your work experience, you have and will learn that management style matters. In your careers, you will have inspiring supervisors as well as ones whom you don’t “click” with. Each can teach you some valuable lessons for your careers. You can learn a great deal of things from your past and current supervisors (both good things to keep in your quiver for a later time and bad things that you never want to use).

After reviewing the Hawthorne Studies video, for this week’s Class Discussion, what, if any, has been your experience with the Hawthorne effect on a job?   Answer this question and then choose one of the following to answer:

1) Describe a supervisor who inspired and motivated you — what were their characteristics or actions that made such a positive impact?

2) Describe a supervisor who was a poor supervisor (un-motivating, indecisive, uncaring, etc.) – what were their characteristics or actions that made you feel that way?

Be sure to read through one of your classmates posts and provide a response by Saturday at 11:30 PM.

80 Comments for “M9”

Sophia Macander

says:

The video on the Hawthorne studies and the Hawthorne effect was interesting to consider in terms of jobs I have had in the past. My first job was being a server at a restaurant/tourist attraction and at first I tried my hardest to be as nice and efficient as possible, especially because the supervisors seemed to care about us. However, as the season went on they stopped caring and let many of the employees get away with not doing their jobs. It became hard to care about doing my work when they let many other people do nothing while I was working. I guess this shows that when supervisors don’t seem to care about employees they aren’t as productive, as was talked about in the Hawthorne effect video. The job I had the summer after was in a lab at UAF, and that one I had very little supervision due to me being the only person working on my project. However, the lab as a whole had a lot more of a community atmosphere. The grad students and supervisor I worked with made sure to have meetings talking about everyone’s projects, and would check to make sure everything was going well when I was running my projects. That kind of work environment helped me get through my work faster, because I knew I had the support of my coworkers.

As for managers, I have never had a manager that inspired or motivated me greatly. However, my first manager was very poor at his job for several reasons. For instance, he showed a lot of favoritism towards certain employees not because of their work ethic, but because he was personal friends with them or could go drinking with them after work (most of the employees at this specific job were under 21). This meant that he would let these employees get away with doing very little work and then blame other people for their jobs not getting done. Furthermore, he was very disorganized, and would constantly forget things. I had to tell him multiple times if I had a reason to miss work, and then he would forget and blame me for not telling him sooner. However, I don’t just blame my supervisor for the majority of the problems because the upper management was to blame for most of it. They were the ones that cut corners and created a building that was somewhat unsafe to work in (i.e. cheap floors that sweated and became slick in the heat (when we expected 400+ guests to dine there at a time), nails poking out of the walls in several locations). Overall, I just felt like they didn’t care about employee or customer well being.

Jordan Van Treese

says:

Sophia,

I am sorry to hear that you have not experienced an impactful leader yet. They make all the difference and can turn the worst work into a joy. Favoritism, especially blatant in the case that you described, can cripple a workplace. It is one of the most tell tale signs of an immature and ineffective leader. However, you touched on a really good point at the end of your response. Upper management was mostly to blame for all of it. By creating an environment where your direct supervisor could thrive while showing favoritism as well as cutting corners with construction and safety shows a complete lack of care for employees. It probably caused a lot of turnover for them. Caring for employees and making a healthy work environment is an investment, but one that is well worth it and saves money in the long run. It is a shame that some businesses do not realize this, and I am sorry you had to experience that level of incompetence. Hopefully there are some leadership take-aways you can use from this negative experience. Really good response, i enjoyed reading it.

– Jordan

Sophia Macander

says:

Thank you for your response Jordan! Fortunately since then I have had decent/good supervisors both when I worked in a lab and for Residence Life both at UAF. However, by doing both of those jobs I realized I didn’t particularly like either of them, so I couldn’t really call them inspiring. And unfortunately for the serving job it was seasonal, so they only had to keep us there for the summer (not that there weren’t plenty of people who left during the season). In some ways I am glad for the experience I had though, because it taught me what warning signs to look out for when it comes to management, and how I should not treat people if I was ever in their position.

Chief Anestor

says:

Hello Sophia,
It sounds like you have had examples on both sides of the coin on what the impacts of leadership can have on the work environment and the morale of the employees. Having been on both sides myself I can tell you that when the leadership takes a personal interests in their people and you feel like they truly care about your overall well-being the synergy and camaraderie that it creates in the workplace spreads like wildfire. Even though you had those negative experiences, looking at it on a positive note I can tell you that even from the bad work place experiences it is a life lesson in leadership because it is still possible to garner valuable data points for your leadership tool box to where when you take on a leadership role you can be more in touch with the pulse of your workforce.

Jordan Van Treese

says:

My experience with the Hawthorne effect has probably not been as profound of the workers in the Hawthorne Plant or other students here. While I have not ever been involved in a peer reviewed study in relation to my current workplace, upper management from the region office occasionally visited the Wells Fargo branch I used to work at as a banker. While this was immediately following the Wells Fargo customer account scandal, management often insisted on bankers and tellers pushing products to customers, many of whom we knew personally. It felt disingenuous to try and push a product on consumers who had been loyal customers for decades, especially ones that we knew personally and well. One of the reasons why customers stayed loyal to a bank is related to their relationship with their local branch and the employees there. However, whenever management would make their rounds, we would all feel pressured to push whatever new product onto customers. This never sat well with me and the other bankers but our productivity numbers for that day were always very good, which in turn motivated upper management to visit more. In the long run this resulted in many loyal customers either moving branches or leaving Wells Fargo entirely.

Coincidentally, the supervisor that motivated me the most was my first manager, Cynthia, at the Wells Fargo position. The leadership style that motivates and inspires me most is that of servant leadership. Cynthia was the kind of leader that was never afraid of getting her hands dirty and helping whenever needed. While her job involved many other duties that were related to managing the branch, she would never hesitate to personally take care of customers when we would become overwhelmed. She would check on us often and handle problems with confidence, wit and humor. Cynthia was always in good spirits and would continuously defend us against customers who would berate us and shield us against the oftentimes ridiculous requests from upper management. We knew that she cared about us, oftentimes taking the time to sit down and chat during whatever little free time she had, asking us about our families and personally investing her time and energy into our futures and professional development. She never crossed the line of friendship vs. manager, but we always felt comfortable coming to her with any problems we encountered at work. She often took the blame for things that were not her fault to shield us from management of customer vitriol. She was selfless, caring and dedicated to those under her charge, the textbook definition of a servant leader. I hope to be half the leader and manager she is someday.

Sophia Macander

says:

Hi Jordan, I really enjoyed reading your response and perspective on the Hawthorne effect and your manager from when you worked at Wells Fargo. I thought it was really interesting how you mentioned feeling pressure to sell customers new products when the management was around, which makes sense. I haven’t ever really had that experience, but that is because I have never worked anywhere where I was selling individual products (except for a couple days when I worked at a Farmer’s Market for a neighbor, which was quite the experience). I did very much like hearing about your motivating manager, and it gives me hope of finding a job with an excellent manager one day (hopefully in a job I really like, because I have had a couple jobs with good managers but I didn’t really like the job itself). She really does sound very well organized and responsible, and that she cared about her employees well-being. It seems like everyone is happier, and problems can actually be solved if a supervisor is willing to listen to the concerns of employees. I hope you are able to find future supervisors that inspire that type of work environment in the future!

John Carlson

says:

Hi Jordan, I found your post to be interesting. It was interesting the pressure that was applied to by the upper management of the bank. It seemed like the employees’ values, and the business was not ailing, which was creating tension. What exactly was the issue with this was that the products that were being pushed to loyal customers were not worth it compared to similar products offered by other establishments. Which made it was uncomfortable trying to sell people who are loyal to the Brand a lousy deal? Or was it the fact that you were trying to use the customers’ trust to sell them a product? I can imagine the difficulty placed on someone in that position, which forces you to do something that you do not believe in or would not normally condone but is obligated to do.

Jordan Van Treese

says:

Thanks for your response! It was more so the latter situation you described. Oftentimes customers would state to me personally that they were relieved that they weren’t members at a bank where their bankers would try to push products on them. They stated it seemed dishonest and I was hard pressed to disagree. I felt like I was using a real relationship that I had built in order to increase productivity. I felt like I was doing a disservice to my clients who I knew at the bottom of my heart didn’t need the newest “travel account” etc. The look of disappointment on my clients faces when I knew upper management was looking over my shoulder and was expecting a sale from me, was one of the worst feelings I have ever felt. I felt disingenuine and dirty, and it was one of the reasons I decided to leave.

Chief Anestor

says:

Hey Jordan,
I enjoyed reading your response you really gave me a sense of what type of leader that Cynthia was and is I feel like I could literally close my eyes and picture providing the type of top cover that is necessary from a supervisor. A true leader should never throw a subordinate under the bus. I have lost count of the number of times I have fallen on the sword to cover my junior personnel even though my supervisors and their superiors knew differently I stuck to my guns and later corrected whatever the deficiency was sometimes it may have been whether it was lack of training, knowledge, or rest. Having Cynthia as a mentor has set you up for success and you will be a great leader will you always get things right probably not but who does? What is important is that you have a solid foundation to build on.

Cole Sudkamp Walker

says:

For my first Internship at a solar company I didn’t have any official supervision. I was taught the trade by two senior members and I reported to them so they were in effect my supervisors. My experiences with both were very nice. I did a lot of grunt work but there was something new everyday. I worked my way towards a paid position as a solar roof installer in a crew of 3 three but still was very much a jack of all trades, cleaning, buying hardware, and forklifting out panels from a shipping container, and the regular solar installations. The amount of work done for each day varied wildly so some mistakes did happen, nothing too serious. There was one week where we installed 3 solar systems in 4 days. The crew was amazed how fast I was able to pick up the necessary skills and roof installments that almost always took at least 2 days rather than one we were cranking out. I was always encouraged. I had already shown my strong work ethic as an intern so I was mostly left to my own devices. Briefed each morning on what was to be done and to give updates on current progress. My upper supervisor who briefed us didn’t observe us directly but he gave us the cumulative total of panels we put up, the miles of strut we were using, and the kilowatts of power that we put on the grid. By the end of summer the 3 of us put up something like 800 panels and quarter of a million watts added to the grid about 1/30th of a natural gas plant. So even on bad days we still could look at what we had done.

My overall experience was overwhelmingly positive. And the worst days weren’t so bad. Two days I can think of were the rainy days and the day of doing nothing. So We’re were doing a ground mount with 80 some panels we spent about 3 hours on building it (with prefabricated A frames. Then we got a call from Golden Valley Electric that we didn’t have approval for the mount. This happened often a lower level worker would approve our projects then an upper manager would see it and call it off. So we cease working and call our upper management on what to do. We had planned working on the ground mount the next 3 or so days and most of our strut had been put towards building these massive A frames (like 20 feet tall). Upper management scrambled through the next few projects and we were split up with our electrician going to a different house while we finished a steel roof with a preinstalled inverter. Our electrician was by far the most senior member of the crew and the 2 of us reported to him and were assigned roles. So myself and a coworker of about 2 months my senior went to the steel roof. It then started to rain by the time we arrived. Working in the rain always sucks on the steel roof. It is downright dangerous and should never be done; it is simply too slippery with a long fall. tile roofs are manageable in the rain. In our inexperience we attempted to install anchors thinking that with them installed we could effectively install the panels however we managed to put one anchor in in 3 hours that normally takes about half an hour. My coworker feared telling uppermangement but I was at my limit and said that it was unnecessarily dangerous, slow and we needed to go back another day. So we called uppermangement, explained, and within 15 minutes we were packing up to join our electrician supervisor. We got to the house, set up the ladder, checked the roof, only to see that the roofer who installed the tiles had no idea what they were doing. No caulk was sealing the tiles down, the nails had almost no head so the nails just ripped the tiles. We knew the drill at this point called upper management and said that we could not install on this roof. The scary part is that this was a suburbia all the houses look the same and probably had the work done by the same crew so I wouldn’t be surprised if all the houses were like that. By this time our work day was done and mostly nothing had been aclominsted and we were paid to sit in the rain. When we went back our uppermanager just said good job today, some days are just bad. I was glad that our unproductive day didn’t count against us.

Kenneth Meggitt

says:

I encountered the Hawthorne Effect in my job as a seasonal groundskeeper in which the boss was very collaborative in the sense we would get together in the mornings and plan out what needed to be done for the week and figure out how to complete daily goals to ensure what needed to be done each week got accomplished. This boss was the first one to introduce me to the management concept of “Leading from the boat” vs “Leading from the shore”. Most recently I’ve seen a trend in the management of departments that match this method. Daily morning meetings where the group gets together to discuss what they did the previous day along with any problems that arose and finally what they plan to do the current day and if they need any help completing any tasks or projects.

I would have to say the manager had the most positive impact on me and formulated the best way to motivate me and the people I would go on to supervise in the future was my boss when I was a groundskeeper. He was very laid back but very focused on safety over speed in which things got done. Which is very critical when working with heavy equipment and motorized systems that rotate blades and tilling tongs at high speeds. The only time he “yelled” adjust my behavior was when he thought I was pushing to get stuff done too fast and he was worried I’d pull a muscle or hurt myself trying to outpace some of the more seasoned employees. The conversation basically when as follows: “HEY!!!!” “take it easy, man, it’s not THAT big of a rush, Just get it done before lunch” What I found impressive about him and I continue to look for in managers today is the concept of “Leading from the boat” vs “Leading from the shore” He was always working “with” us as opposed for us working “for” him. A good manager uses inclusive terms when discussing requirements and goals for the organization. “We need to get our work done faster” “We need to improve the quality of our department’s output” compared to “You need to get your work done faster” and “You need to improve your quality” This boss taught me a good manager will succeed or fail with the people they manage as their performance is a reflection of the quality of their influence and management style. This behavior engenders loyalty and admiration. I suspect if anyone thinks back to when a boss threw them to the wolves about missing a project deadline or doing something wrong as opposed to taking responsibility for the group’s misstep or failure and pledge to resolve the issue together and move forward instead of dwelling on past failures.

Amanda Hanson

says:

I appreciate the phrases and terminology you use in this response! It’s easy to fall into the habit of using the same phrases like, “Managing by walking around”. Adding to your tool belt creates more credibility. I work closely with a manager who overuses phrases like, “this is critical” and “that’s on me”. The statements start to lose their meaning because he uses them too readily and isn’t being thoughtful or mindful of his responses or presentations.

Especially in a physically risky job that sees a lot of turnover, I’m glad you had an effective, focused leader.

Cole Sudkamp Walker

says:

I had a similar experience as a solar installer. It’s very nice to have a boss that values their workers. Physically labor is hard work and everyone knows their own limits not anyone else. Going in day after day it is extremely important to pace yourself. An injury is one of the worst things that can happen on a job for employer and employee. Nothing is more dangerous than a boss who doesn’t know or care of the consequences.

John Aldabe

says:

After reviewing the Hawthorne Studies video, I reflected on various jobs to think about any experiences the Hawthorne effect had on my jobs. At first, I was felt hard pressed, but thought how monumental the studies were post modern industrial revolution; an era where employees were viewed basically as an extension of machinery and I realized one way or another most if not all my jobs provided me with experiences from the Hawthorne effect. Many of my jobs seem to have had a degree of autocratic supervision with no benefits or little benefits available, however with contemplation I noticed a hybrid of my perceived overbearing supervision and realized in many cases some Hawthorne effect in place. For example, ideas from workers were routinely gathered by management at one workplace, some were used. Employee participation into the idea program became popular, sadly the program ended soon after start as to much administrative time was spent sorting through the submitted ideas, worker moral dropped considerably, and management viewed it as a loss. Management allowing work to get done how workers want to do it is an effect I have felt in a job to a degree, as long as the basic principles and rules were followed, bottom line, the work completed, management happy. Also, I have experienced management encouraging employee sit-downs to discuss work, which seemed like a good idea, however proved dysfunctional when it turned out sit-downs seemed to lead to layoffs or monitoring rather than ways to improve the work place.
I am going to describe a supervisor that in the beginning seemed to have positive intentions, however after a short time in the supervisor’s seat (and a short time as manager), it became clear this person was a poor manager. Most everyone in the organization felt de-motivated as the manager was constantly indecisive and most notably uncaring with a phrase heard all to often “not my problem”. The manager would pit other lower managers against each other to spawn competition amongst organizational resources in which the manager always won (“not my problem”). Lofty goals were set, that were not possible to meat, for example; bonus if you make 40% profit after all projects sold were at that mark (industry norm was 10%) while no control over selling price was established which was traditionally low and under any budget (in ‘the red’ to start off) with the idea lower managers had to figure out how to make money (“not my problem”). When this manager was dismissed (I was gone by then), I returned and filled the vacant seat, but still the bad taste lingered. All the drama and issues created, the one that stuck with me the most “not my problem”, inspired me to adopt a new slogan, “that is my problem”.

Brock McKiness

says:

John,
The situation you referenced, where employee ideas were collected but management cut the program, is a sad execution of a good idea. It sounds like ideas were submitted instead of simply listened to. There would be far less administration time spent if the ideas were funneled through people orally. It is a shame when an organization dismisses a good thing because its leaders cannot see the value from their perspective.
Also, it is good to hear that something was learned from the bad leader situation. It is a remarkable thing that people can take away value from almost anything. Learning what not to do, is just as valuable as learning what to do.

Blanche Sam

says:

After reviewing the Hawthorne Studies video, for this week’s Class Discussion, what, if any, has been your experience with the Hawthorne effect on a job?

In a banking job that I had as a teller, knowing I was being observed made me want to do my job better. I worked harder and faster when observed. Knowing that people took notice of the work I did, was also a motivator to do well. In my current position, I am rarely monitored and set my own pace and I am currently completing this assignment at work, so that might tell you something. It is a slower time of the year for me though in my position.

Q1.) Describe a supervisor who inspired and motivated you — what were their characteristics or actions that made such a positive impact?

When I was a supervisor at a bank branch, my manager, was great. She was easy to talk to, she loved to laugh and joke, she was kind and knowledgeable, but she also had a serious side when it came to work. She inspired me to want to be a better supervisor and I think I carried a lot of things I learned from her into the years that I was a supervisor. One thing, she used food to bring us all together. I think her sense of humor and her caring manner was what made the biggest impact on me. She was the perfect person to learn from. She held years of experience as a manager and did a great job.

Victoria Murphy

says:

Hi Blanche,

I laughed when you said you were completing this assignment at work — I have DEFINITELY been there before, haha. Before this week’s material, were you familiar with the Hawthorne effect? This was the first time I officially learned about it, but the information didn’t surprise me. It makes sense that someone would work faster or be more productive under supervision. I’m glad you had such a positive experience with your bank branch manager. Being human (i.e. caring, having real conversations, laughing) sounds like a common thread other classmates are identifying as good supervisor traits. I certainly agree with it, but isn’t that interesting? What makes some people in a leadership role stop being human? Is it the pressure of responsibility?

In my response to another classmate, I touched on the fact that maybe supervisors adopt their organization’s mannerisms, so if the organization’s rules and regulations are harsh, perhaps they become harsher, too. What are your thoughts on this?

Blanche Sam

says:

Sorry, I just saw this. I agree with the supervisors adopting their organizations mannerisms. In the second bank I worked at my manager was tough. Everything was very rigid in the organization and I believe it started at the top, pressure from the board to the executives, who then put pressure on the managers and my manager put pressure on me to put pressure on the tellers. I really did not enjoy that job. I did well at it and she cried when I left but it was very stressful. I remember dreading going to work every day.

Cole Sudkamp Walker

says:

Hello Blanche, I’ve been there at work sometimes. You’ve made me realize the flip side of being observed. There are cases were it helps to motivate you and those where it can be a hindrance. A friend of my works retail and some days are just slow. Every time the boss came by everyone has to make themselves look busy even when there’s nothing to do. A better boss would put workers to work somewhere else in the store or would just lay back and realize that looking busy does’t really do anything and that there are just slow days.

Blanche Sam

says:

Yes and that was how I felt in my second job in banking. I had to look busy when I did not have anything to do. So I used that time to give the tellers I was supervising tasks. I enjoyed the days when I did not feel that pressure.

Jessica Boyce

says:

My experience with the Hawthorne Effect would be my past three years of my athletic career. I have had three different coaches for each year and have gotten the same result out of all of them. The first team that I competed on was pretty bad. Not just score wise, but culturally it was bad. My freshman year, girls on the team were going after the ones that shot higher scores and they were creating a negative and unproductive environment. The same thing happened during my freshman year (not totally surprised because it was the same team). One thing that all three coaches didn’t provide during the seasons was accountability. They would sit back and watch as the athletes would do whatever they wanted during their training time, which was difficult for me to watch because I was busting my butt to shoot the higher scores in order for me to catch the other coaches attention so I could transfer. Sadly, my first year at UAF, the coaching staff did not keep us accountable and every single athlete, including me, couldn’t motivate ourselves enough to compete at our best.
My sophomore year I dealt with a terrible coach. He was only interested in the coaching position because it was a job. He had no interest in the athletes, the only thing he was interested in was the money. That year I dealt with injuries, title IX issues, very poor coaching and very rude and heartbreaking conversations. He didn’t care about the athletes and only cared about his ego and that all determined on if the team shot a good score. He didn’t motivate us, he didn’t coach us, he did nothing. It was really tough to go through that, but if it wasn’t for him I wouldn’t know what it was like to “work” for someone who didn’t want anyone around them to succeed.

Kenneth Meggitt

says:

Jessica,
I found your athletic team perspective Interesting. I hadn’t quite considered it in that manner before but in truth, an athletic team isn’t much different from a functional work team as both are ideally working towards a common goal. If not, neither would be productive in any fashion. Encouraging an environment of competition between teammates or coworkers can create an exceptionally toxic environment. I’ve observed this type of behavior in other departments. I’ve watched some managers encourage a culture of competition that boarded on a “hunger games” style of promotion where coworkers would steal projects from each other to complete and gain rank within the department which would eventually lead to a promotion and a better more secure job. The manager would routinely remind the staff that if you languished in a lower status too long you would be “laid off” which was a euphemism for effectively being fired in that environment. The environment was so toxic the department was bleeding talent and did not stabilize and begin to recover until the manager was replaced. It sounds like some of the coaches you’ve been exposed to adopted similar methods of “encouragement” which is very unfortunate. As I said in my post in my experience the best managers are the ones that “Lead from the boat” as opposed to the ones that “Lead from the shore”. I’ve found the best visual example of this is the 1851 painting “Washington Crossing the Delaware” by Emanuel Leutze. In this painting, we see the leader of the American revolution in the same boat as his soldiers crossing the river to fight the British. He didn’t sit inside a warm tent while his army crossed the river to risk their lives. He was on the front lines with them risking it all alongside them. That is the type of leader everyone should be or work for; be it a CEO, director, boss, manager, supervisor, lead, captain, or coach.

Scott Jacobs

says:

I’ve found the Hawthorne effect has been prevalent during the first couple of weeks of a new job since this is when a company is ensuring you’re a good fit for them. As a result, I’m most dedicated to the job and working my hardest to show that I deserve the position, even if I don’t like it. Last summer, I had a job that consisted mainly of fieldwork. I seriously considered quitting after the second day because it was brutal; walking an average ten miles a day through high heat and taking water samples is not fun. Despite having a significant distaste for my job, I continued working hard to show that I’m a worthwhile employee hoping it’ll lead to more significant opportunities. Essentially, the Hawthorne effect encouraged me to work harder because I had supervisors checking up on me, but after a while, I just took my time and did my own thing. It’s worth noting, this summer, they upgraded the GPS to provide a live location, allowing supervisors to watch how much time is spent on a site and correlate it with data collected. If I did enjoy the job and considered going back, that would be a significant deterrent since I enjoyed the personal freedom the position provided, allowing me to enjoy it at times.

Last summer, I had a supervisor with a manger above him; my supervisor concentrated on making sure everyone was working, with our manager running the day to operations and dealing with broader issues. The manager was competent at his job based on his people skills and work experience, but I didn’t like the supervisor. The supervisor was friendly and always tried to stay positive, except he operated more like an employee who assumed he always knew best. For example, we would drive to remote locations where the truck can get, and he would be the one to come out and assess the situation. I got my vehicle stuck in a patch of mud, and it needed a slight tug to get unstuck; without taking me and my co-worker’s consideration into account, the slight tug, on getting the truck unstuck. Our supervisor assumes he knows best and proceeds to bury the truck in the mud, making it harder to get out. He also lacks the interpersonal skills to talk with an employee when they aren’t in a good mood, essentially boiling down to; if you don’t want to be here, go home. He had this vendetta against me about money. He always assumed I was never satisfied with the salary since I had another job that paid more, resulting in him thinking I was not too fond of the job solely based on the payroll. In sum, he was nice but should invest in some management courses to better improve his supervisory skill.

Jordyn Sager

says:

Scott, Great post! I can see how you found it hard to work with the supervisor! It sounds as if he was just a player on the team who thought he was the best but really wasn’t. I can see how frustrating that can be. Its also not cool you almost had to tip toe around him for no reason!

Amanda Hanson

says:

You’ve made a good point by identifying how the Hawthorne Effect influences a specific situation. I also appreciate how you managed to offer up the redeeming quality your supervisor possessed, despite his flaws. Obviously, his overall failings in leadership had negative consequences, but I hold faith that people, if motivated, can educate themselves and improve upon their skills.

Brett Ferris

says:

what, if any, has been your experience with the Hawthorne effect on a job? I believe the Hawthorne effect has had an impact both positively and negatively.

When it comes to work, I tend to be self motivated. When I know I am being supervised directly or not, I do not let it impact me too much. I tend to be a big believer in letting my work stand on its own. I have been in both job settings where managers have either monitored me closely or rarely talked to me at all. My production and job satisfaction remained the same for the most part.

1) Describe a supervisor who inspired and motivated you — what were their characteristics or actions that made such a positive impact?

A supervisor I had that was a great motivator who led by example while being down to earth and realizing we are all working here for the same reason. This supervisor had a great hybrid approach of guiding you through jobs while letting you take on challenges and spearhead problems on your own. He understood that there is only so much you can do to manage employees in the right direction and not control them. Using moderate positive reinforcement and rare but sometimes needed negative reinforcement, this supervisor was almost perfect. It was as if he was something out of a business textbook.

2) Describe a supervisor who was a poor supervisor (un-motivating, indecisive, uncaring, etc.) – what were their characteristics or actions that made you feel that way?

One manager I had that I would describe as poor was a control freak who could not keep negative opinions about the work being done to himself. He was always a disgruntled character and seemed like the reward of his power relived his shortcomings. I would often catch him saying things such as “because I’m the manager” when giving directions while not being able to mediate. Him not being able to explain his directions properly and getting easily frustrated while taking that frustration out on others, made it extremely hard for me to respect his role as manager.

Sandra Bishop

says:

Hi Brett
Great descriptions of both positive and negative experiences with supervisors. Sounds like your second manager was in over his head, and he probably got that at some level, which is what made him so angry. Some people are just naturally better at understanding other people, and I think it’s impossible to be a great leader without that quality. But people can learn to be better leaders. Your other supervisor might very well have learned some great management techniques from a business textbook or school.

You mentioned being self-motivated. Same here. Employees are not all the same; some need more extrinsic motivation and constant feedback, whereas others do better with a more hands-off style. Being monitored on a regular basis would make me very uncomfortable. But it’s pretty common in a lot of service industry jobs I think.

Victoria Murphy

says:

After reviewing the Hawthorne Studies video and reflecting on my work experience, my productivity absolutely increases when I know I’m being watched. For example, I worked at American Eagle during my first two years of college. When I was a sales associate and my manager would watch me, I would fold jeans quicker, speak to more customers, and move with more motivation. On the flip side, when I was promoted to a manager, if I opened the store by myself and all the opening duties were done, I’d be on my phone until an opening associate arrived. Now, as I near the end of my undergraduate degree and look forward to my graduate program, I’m curious to see whether this effect will be as strong once I’m working in a field I’m passionate about. Notably, the job I pursue after graduation will be something I’m passionate about, rather than a position to make money and get by, so I’m curious to know whether or not the Hawthorne study will be applicable.

For the second half of this discussion board, I will describe a supervisor that was a poor supervisor. In high school, I had a summer job at an outdoor recreation facility. There was the main recreation facility (which is where I worked), then a second facility about an hour away. The main recreation facility handled all reservations for both locations, so there was frequent communication between the main shop and the second facility. In terms of organization, there was one core supervisor with two supervisors below him: one for the main shop and one for the second facility. The poor supervisor I will be describing was assigned to the second facility; however, since there was frequent communication between the two, I crossed paths with him a lot. The characteristics that made him a poor supervisor was the unwillingness to take input from subordinates, not following company policy (not counting the cash till at the end of each cashier’s shift), and blaming others for his wrongdoings. One day, I was calling to let the second facility know about a new cabin reservation and he answered the phone. I told him the details, then hours later when the family arrived, he called and yelled at me for not letting him know. Although I remember clear as day calling him, I took the fall for him not writing the reservation down. Little things like this happened a lot over the course of the summer and it was frustrating. Because of him and the neglect of the other supervisors, I didn’t have high job satisfaction and didn’t return after that summer.

According to Shaw (2017), job satisfaction is a key component to worker performance; however, it may be an economic cost to companies. The text discloses various ways to improve job satisfaction, such as increasing paid time off, additional training, or revamping work procedures to suit employees (Shaw, 2017). Based on this week’s video and readings, it seems as though companies are taking great strides to improve the quality of life for their employees. Hopefully, I will have a great workplace environment with high job satisfaction.

References
AT&T Archives. (2011, November 28). AT&T archives: The year they discovered people [Video]. YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D3pDWt7GntI&feature=youtu.be

Shaw, W. (2017). Business ethics: Ninth edition. Cengage Learning.

Shawn Tukua

says:

Nice Post Victoria. I appreciated the examples you shared for this discussion board. I agree with you that when an employee knows they are being observed by a supervisor, work increases as the Hawthorne Effect findings suggest. The characteristics you described from the supervisor are unfortunate and you did a very good job o explaining how job satisfaction is impacted by the supervisors characteristics and your interactions with them. You are spot-on that a supervisor can have a huge impact on how an employee perceives their value with the organization and ultimately their satisfaction working in that role for the company. As uncomfortable as the experience can be working for a poor supervisor with these qualities, it appears apparent that you will make great efforts to not repeat these behavors when you ara a supervisor. You will work hard to be present and attentive to your employees and mindful to appreciate their efforts and when wrong, exercise the humility to take responsibility for your errors and not dismiss them on others. Nice post.

Shawn Tukua

says:

If you are paid by an individual, company, or organization to provide a service or a product there is most likely a standard of work that must be met in order to maintain a productive work environment and bring value to your employment. In the 1920’s and 1930’s a set of experiments were conducted, and the effects of the studies measured in productivity in addition to an employee’s engagement in the workplace. The findings of the study “suggests that workers tend to change their behavior at work in response to the attention they receive from their supervisor” (Corporate Finance Institute, n.d.). This came to be known as the Hawthorne effect. Within the Los Angeles Fire Department, effective supervisors apply at least some of the principles, whether consciously known or not, from the study that was originally performed at the General Electric company. Performance, productivity, and job satisfaction are real effects from LAFD members that are consistently and positively engaged by their supervisors. From personal observations, supervisors that are mentally and physically present and accountable to their members, more frequently have employees and subordinates that are more engaged, have increased work productivity, and fewer disciplinary issues.
Given the culture and 150-year history of the Los Angeles Fire Department (LAFD), there have been some exceptional supervisors who have left a lasting impression long after their retirement from the Fire Service. Retired Chief Deputy Joe Castro held the second highest rank with the LAFD and served as the Emergency Operations Commander. Some of the outstanding characteristics that Castro possessed and conveyed to his members were approachability, a sincere interest in a member’s well-being, and a vested interest in every member’s ability to safely and effectively perform the duties required of their position/rank. In comparison, the Hawthorne effect identified “that employees, be it in the 1920s or a hundred years later, want to be heard and valued. That is what increases their motivation level, and the final outcome is enhanced productivity. Happier employees are more productive employees” (Mallick, 2018). An effective supervisor’s characteristics do not always come naturally, and more frequently than not, require an active and consistent assessment and self-reflection. One way to increase your effectiveness as a supervisor or leader, is to create pathways for mentorship and honest feedback. A humble supervisor that is open minded and can exercise humility with feedback stands a far greater chance of improving their relationships with their employees, their job satisfaction and happiness, that can lead to increased productivity moving forward.

References
Corporate Finance Institute. (2019, May 20). Hawthorne Effect: The Changing of Behavior Due to an Awareness of Being Observed. https://corporatefinanceinstitute.com/resources/careers/soft-skills/hawthorne-effect/

Mallick, A. (2018, April 1). The Hawthorne Effect: A Precursor to Employee Productivity. Business Manager. https://www.businessmanager.in/the-hawthorne-effect-a-precursor-to-employee-productivity.php

Amanda Hanson

says:

My experience with the Hawthorne effect has been in accordance with the studies. I’ve experienced it on a personal level and also observed it in different types of work groups. Though I prefer to work on my own and on my own timeline, it’s motivating to know that my work will count for something eventually. I appreciate the feedback and interaction that comes with accountability.

These days, especially with easy access to the internet and multiple streams of entertainment designed to hold our attention, workers can be easily distracted. During times when supervisors aren’t available to monitor work groups, employees have the opportunity to slip into a habit of watching YouTube on the clock or mindlessly scrolling through Facebook. If they know a supervisor is likely to check in or if they are required to produce a report by a particular deadline, they are more likely to stay on task.

My current supervisor changed my job drastically when a company reorganization made her my supervisor. Previously, I had been left to my own devices. Fourteen years ago, my position was brand new, I was trying to build the job, and my supervisors had no idea what my role needed to be or how they could best utilize my skills. I was very dissatisfied with my job, but stayed put because the benefits were good and the freedom I was afforded seemed worth the sacrifice. Immediately, my new supervisor added value to my job by giving me tasks that directly affected the workgroup I was part of. She also empowered me by inviting me to meetings, saying my name, and expressing her confidence in me in public settings. She is always willing to recognize my responsibility for my own tasks, but is always willing to help if needed. Additionally, our work group is spread across multiple sites, so most of our contact is through email and phone calls. We meet through teleconference once a month and make the time to get together in person at least once a year. It takes a lot of effort because part of our work group is a 2 hour drive away, but she makes it a priority because she recognizes it’s important for us to build a personal connection as well.

Blanche Sam

says:

It is definitely hard some days to stay on task without supervision, I am also left to my own devices, it takes a lot of self motivation at times to get things done. I think it is great that your supervisor is awesome. I cannot imagine it would be easy for her to become your supervisor as you did not really have one before and not easy for you as well to all of a sudden have a supervisor but it sounds like it really worked out.

John Carlson

says:

what, if any, has been your experience with the Hawthorne effect on a job?

After reviewing the video on the Hawthorne studies and the Hawthorne effect, I realized my experience with the Hawthorne effect at work. I’ve never really had a very profound experience with the Hawthorne effect. I’ve noticed that when working at my job application, I’ll get tasks to do some things. Depending on if there is an observer, for example, like the person who asked for the task comes in makes and checks up on the progress of the tasks, I tend to perform quite a bit better. If the task would usually take three days for me to do, if no one was observing, then I could do it in a day and a half if someone was checking up.

Describe a supervisor who was a poor supervisor (un-motivating, indecisive, uncaring, etc.) – what were their characteristics or actions that made you feel that way?

An experience I’ve had with a poor supervisor was that they were never really good at supervising. It didn’t seem like they should be in that sort of role. He would give work that I’d never completed, and I would just ask clarifying questions. He would not answer the simple questions; he was unreasonable, not replying to the questions, and could be belligerent. It seemed like they were only able to do the task but could not explain what was asked. Being unable to answer the question seemed to cause some sort of insecurity and would cause him to lash out. If people started to ask questions to learn or tried to do the job correctly, it tended to not work out that well-causing people to just have to figure it out themselves and avoid the supervisor.

Zachary Stallings

says:

John, It’s crazy that supervisors/Leaders get put into these position because they know how to perform the job properly but then can’t Lead or don’t know how to lead without getting frustrated and lashing out.

Jessica Egbejimba

says:

what, if any, has been your experience with the Hawthorne effect on a job?
Working for the state every pay period we earned vacation time. So depending on how many hours you took off you could check your “balance”. If you had enough hours you usually could use them in anyway and at anytime provided your boss cleared it. We also regularly had to evaluate our supervisor.

Describe a supervisor who was a poor supervisor (un-motivating, indecisive, uncaring, etc.) – what were their characteristics or actions that made you feel that way?
When I worked at Fred Meyers my supervisor was like a close friend to me. From the day I started the job to the day I quit she was a great boss. She always made sure I knew what task I had to do and also made sure I was well prepared to preform them. When I moved on she also gave me an amazing reference! Till this day I would go back to that job solely because of her

Jacqueline Ferreira

says:

Jessica,
It is so nice when you have a Supervisor that is like a friend to you. It really makes work fun and always makes the environment much better. I myself had a Supervisor like that and still friends with him to this day although I switched Police Departments.

Scott Jacobs

says:

Your supervisor at Fred Meyers sounds like a fantastic person to work for, especially since you’d return to that solely on her impact on you. It’s not common to always have an amazing boss, but it’s still rewarding when that’s the case. When I worked in a county job, are vacation time worked in the same fashion, and I always found it very convenient. It’s rewarding to earn time off instead of being given a set number of days; it motivates you to work slightly harder and provides higher career satisfaction.

Heidi Livengood

says:

After reviewing the Hawthorne Studies video, for this week’s Class Discussion, what, if any, has been your experience with the Hawthorne effect on a job?

Before watching the video I had not previously heard about the Hawthorne Studies. I thought the findings were very interesting in that workers were more productive when they were treated as people and felt cared for. This brought back a memory from my childhood that I’m sure many that watched Disney movies remember. There is a scene in Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs where they are in the mine digging and then on the way home singing, ‘Heigh Ho.”

One of my first jobs was working at Ft. Wainwright Commissary as a cart pusher. Bagging groceries can be a very monotonous job ordinarily. Instead of having one bagger per checkout the supervisors there made sure they there were always two people bagging. We were so much more productive and enjoyed the work when we had a partner there to support us. Through that experience I about how important the social aspect of work can be.

1) Describe a supervisor who inspired and motivated you — what were their characteristics or actions that made such a positive impact?

In my last job I was working for Disney at one of their gaming studios. Two days after starting the job my supervisor left for medical leave. Even though we had briefly met we were able to form a wonderful connection. She had confidence and that showed in how she treated others with respect and genuine kindness. She did not hesitate to express her gratitude. That alone with a hands-off approach to managing gave me the freedom to learn from my mistakes and improve processes for the company. I truly believe that micro-managing someone limits their potential.

Al Davis

says:

Great point, humble beginnings leads to appreciation for the larger responsibilities as in the next job. I was a bagger at the commissary in 1987; least paid day was $3/hr, most paid day was $60/hr. I liked that you attribute productivity to having two people working together.

Brock McKiness

says:

This is not the first time I came across the Hawthorn experiments. I still cannot imagine a world where it took years of testing and research to learn what they did. Maybe it was already known human relations had an impact but not the severity. Then again, I have come across so many leaders in the service that clearly had no comprehension of the importance of moral or taking care of their people.

One leader, I had early in my military career, was particularly unmotivating. He was an arrogant, pathological liar. Worse than that, he never listened and punished me habitually for things out of my control. Luckily, he was not my leader for long.

For as many bad leaders as I have come across, I have also seen my share of really good ones. One, in particular, was very motivating and got even the laziest of us to work hard. He was transparent, worked hard himself, listened when people had problems, gave everyone the freedom to take care of their personal issues, and he empowered everyone to make improvements in the workplace. That sounds like a lot, but it does not take much to establish trust in a team and the rest normally follows.

Victoria Murphy

says:

Hi Brock,

Thank you for sharing your take on the Hawthorne Effect. Before this lesson, I hadn’t heard of the experiments, so I’m glad that you were already familiar with them. Isn’t it a weird thought that a basic principle to us today was a new discovery only a few decades ago? It definitely puts history into perspective. Anyways, the traits you list for a poor supervisor are similar to what I wrote in my discussion board post. It seems like leaders have the potential of taking on the “high and mighty” persona, which encourages arrogance.

Do you think leadership is a learned skill or are people naturally born with great leadership skills? What do you think shapes a supervisor into being a poor supervisor? Do you think supervisors and subordinate employees’ attitudes are a result of the greater organizational structure? I know that’s several questions, but I think that workers can be a result of the organization at large. I’m curious to know your thoughts. In my opinion, a supervisor became a supervisor because they “fit the bill” the organization was looking for (experience, attitude, persona, etc). When promoted, a supervisor takes on the responsibility of supporting an organization’s mission and rules, so if the mission and rules are not entirely ethical, then maybe the supervisor won’t behave ethically. What are your thoughts on this?

Sandra Bishop

says:

The Hawthorne Studies revealed that the workplace is in fact a social organization, and that teamwork, collaboration, autonomy and feeling appreciated are important factors in worker satisfaction and productivity.

I’ve had some low-wage jobs which offered no control over work hours or any input into decision-making; the sources of job satisfaction for me were relationships with coworkers, and an intrinsic desire to perform tasks well. In one job in particular, being treated like a cog in a machine was an apt description, and much of it was time based. Producing a high-paced daily output was the overriding goal, drilled into us continually, and employees felt pressured to jump-start their productivity by showing up early and preparing their work stations before clocking in. A third occasion of clocking in late to work by even one minute was grounds for dismissal. Once a month, all employees (including those on their days off) had to come in and stand around in a circle while the supervisor pointed out problems and conveyed general dissatisfaction with overall performance. Had the management style been more collaborative, respectful and flexible, I might have lasted longer.

Working in a more professional setting in contract administration was a lot more satisfying, because the work was more interesting; my supervisor also left it up to me to schedule tasks and decide how to solve problems for the most part. We had a friendly relationship, and I felt respected and valued as an employee.

I ended up being most disappointed by a third supervisor who was very friendly and approachable. I liked them, but soon found out that they would gossip with certain people about employees and others. This was a summer internship, so this two-faced behavior didn’t ultimately have much impact. But it did bother me at the time.

George Deal

says:

I hate to hear about the third supervisor in your post. This can be a really toxic problem in the workplace, and one I have had to combat before. The solution that worked for me was to create a more open door policy where employees could come and vent (assuming the gossip was work related), and work through appropriate channels, instead of complaining to lower ranks or spreading discontent. Everyone needs to vent, and providing a constructive way to do so can be one of the most beneficial approaches I have seen implemented.

Al Davis

says:

1) The supervisor who inspired and motivated me was a LEADER vice manager. He sought me out for what I could contribute to his team even though I was in trouble. His investment in me fueled my inspiration for decades after his hiring me. The characteristic of him that stuck out to me was his including me in every event that happened in the shop. Just like the Hawthorne studies showed, there was a genuine interest in my person. Mangers typically are not taught how to invest in people, or that their worth, aside from the process they manage, matters on any scale.

2) Before I start this portion, supervisors are in both management and leadership roles. The difference I’ve learned to separate management from leadership is; management is interested in results of a process, leaders interests are in producing talented people with more skills than when they started and are not concerned with the workers taking off with the goods they were given in the form of development. The obvious “they made me feel like a number” is where I would start with a bad supervisor. I’ve had too many bad supervisors to count. They took very little interest in me as a person, to the point of my thinking they were a narcissist and I was their means to an end. There was a saying along the way I adopted for these kinds of people; Self-Serving, Career-Maneuvering, Agenda-Pushing, Manipulating Invertebrate. Most of them would never have thought of doing what they asked me to accomplish, this leads to warranted disrespect. The use of positional power without any humility is distasteful. Humility bestows honor. This humility I list is bringing yourself to the worker level to communicate with the worker.

Al Davis

says:

Forgot to answer the effect of Hawthrone studies; Yes, when workplace conditions improve or I know I’m being watched, productivity increases. Anytime it looked like I was being invested in, I would ensure I was producing for the mission at hand.

Chief Anestor

says:

My personal experience with the Hawthorne Effect sadly came along extremely late in my military career. During my time in service I’ve experienced wide variety of leadership styles and in a perfect world I would love to tell you how great they were and how much I loved all of them but that would be unrealistic. I believe by the time I reached my sixteenth year of service my mind was made up that I would just grit my teeth and bear it to twenty years and submit my retirement paperwork. That all changed when I met a Command Master Chief (CMC) whose leadership qualities were like nothing that I had ever experienced in my life. This CMC was a servant leader of servant leaders because he took care of his subordinates at every level down to the most junior. He had a personal relationship and knew every one of the 400 men and woman under his charge. I have seen him work side by side in the rain with his lowest ranking personnel because his policy was that as leaders, we shouldn’t ask our people to perform any task that we aren’t willing to do ourselves. After watching, learning, and countless conversations with him I began to pattern my leadership style after him and poured everything in my shop and my whole demeanor about the military and the position I was in changed. I had finally come to the realization that being entrusted to guide, mentor, and protecting America’s young children is an important task that shouldn’t be taken lightly and if you are in it halfheartedly or doing for your own selfish gain that it is not the right line of work for you. I also learned that it is way more rewarding watching the young kid right out of high school thrive and move up the ranks than to be at your own promotion.

Brian Farnes

says:

Hello,
When you talk about resolving yourself to just gritting your teeth and bearing it when it came to the leadership you experienced in the military it reminded me quite a bit of what I’ve heard from friends and coworkers who have served. They almost all describe how random it felt when it came to who was going to be their “boss” as they progressed through their career. I’ve never served myself so I have no experience with this myself, but it seemed like the inconsistency in leadership skills they encountered was frustrating to them, and that if they ended up under someone who was horrible they were basically stuck. It sounds like the CMC you describe was an amazing leader, and his skills were made all the more impressive by the string of bad leadership you had to wade through until you were put under him.

Jacqueline Ferreira

says:

After reviewing the Hawthorne Studies video, for this week’s Class Discussion, what, if any, has been your experience with the Hawthorne effect on a job? Answer this question and then choose one of the following to answer:
1) Describe a supervisor who inspired and motivated you — what were their characteristics or actions that made such a positive impact?
2) Describe a supervisor who was a poor supervisor (unmotivating, indecisive, uncaring, etc.) – what were their characteristics or actions that made you feel that way?

After watching the Hawthorne Studies video, I have had multiple experiences with it, but mainly when I worked at my first Police Department. I worked incredibly hard and never said no to working shifts and was always being listened to and watched while working as a police dispatcher and a Special Law Enforcement Officer I. Being a vital role, you were always being watched to make sure you were doing the right thing and making sure your job was being done correctly. Sadly, not everyone had the same idea and did not display the same amount of professionalism 24/7. Mainly on dayshifts, there is always Supervisors (Chief of Police, Captain’s and Lieutenant’s) working as opposed to night shift where it was just usually a Sergeant and your officers. I myself personally had two co-workers who always worked the night shift, but one of them never showed up for her shifts, and it would result in me getting forced to stay over and no consequences for this employee’s actions. The second employee was constantly sleeping on night shifts and was never getting reported because no one was really observing what was actually going on. In fact, these two employees were rewarded with their “hard work” by being sent to the police academy with me for SLEO I, which was a complete slap to the face. Despite the sadness and frustration I felt, I continued to do my job properly and continue to act professional at all times.

Throughout all of this, I had my one Lieutenant by my side and always there for me through my academic and law enforcement career. He has inspired me and motivated me since I met him. For starters, he has over 20 years of experience and started the same way I did. My Lieutenant definitely was professional, respectful, encouraging, kind, and overall an amazing Supervisor. He was always there to listen and help you at work and even outside of work he was always there to help any of his employees. For me personally, my experience at the Police Department for the two years I worked there, they were not the best, in which I sadly endured mean girls, not so nice comments that were said behind my back, as well my other supervisors making comments about me. Throughout my time working, my Lieutenant was always made aware of what was happening and did his absolute best to help me and fix what was happening. Although, I resigned from the department and transferred to a different Department, I still am very close to my Lieutenant and still keep in touch with him, truly because he has become a mentor to me.

George Deal

says:

One of the supervisors I encountered in my early twenties had an amazing impact on my management career. He owned a small landscaping and lawn maintenance company in Spokane, Washington. He was a welcome change of pace from management I had in the past, primarily because he firmly believed in empowering, teaching, and building the people he employed. He was always open and receptive to ways to improve the operations efficiency, and didn’t adopt an overbearing “been there, done that” mentality (despite the fact that he had built the company from the ground up over the course of twenty years). However, the part that caught me more off guard was the investment he was willing to put into his employees that were vested for a year or more. I watched as he bailed employees out of jail, acknowledging that people made mistakes. I saw him purchase school books for workers trying to better themselves with college education. I witnessed him put an employee struggling with addiction through rehabilitation. Even though each of these were a substantial cost to the company, he built a workforce that would go to the end of the earth for him. They would work whatever hours needed, struggle through any job, and defend their boss to the very end.
One of my worst supervisors is one that I currently have. Although I am in a supervisory role, my current manager is an insistent micromanager. Despite having demonstrated competency time and time again, she continuously demonstrates a lack of trust and support myself and my staff. This behavior has led to a crew that doesn’t trust her decisions, defend her actions, or respect her authority. While her intimidation tactics have scared a number of employees into complying, it has left the morale in the workplace to be described as dismal at best. This is now feeding into a distrust in upper management, and considering this being coupled with an almost 25% pay cut, most employees are seeking other employment.

John Aldabe

says:

George,
That is a fantastic experience and to me, a rare organizational condition you reference with the land scaping company in Spokane. Several points you mentioned are in line with our text (Shaw, 2017), for example off-the -job conduct landed an employee in jail, however as it did not significantly affect work performance, bailing the employee out built loyalty with the person and the organization. The person needing rehab was helped out by the company in a positive way by providing the needed help rather than kicking them to the curb like so often is the case in that situation. As the text states, it can be cost effective to help the person out and rehabilitee them rather than cut them loose, again earning a loyal productive employee. Helping with educating expenses, another noble deed; these workers demonstrated gratitude with high output performance and other workers are motivated knowing by witness, the organization has good intentions and the social work culture is positive. The management style chosen by listening to employees, teaching them and giving them control how to do things demonstrates attributes and techniques I plan to administer one day as a manager. This is an inspiring and encouraging experience you shared and I am happy you had it and thank you for sharing!

Your currant work situation sounds aggravating with a supervisor that shows lack of trust and loosing the faith of the crew is unhealthy for the organization and to no surprise, workers will end up leaving; Loose, Loose. I hope things turn around for you, who knows, perhaps the roles will change and you may find an opportunity to put to use more ideal management styles you have been exposed to and what we are learning about now, good luck!

Jordyn Sager

says:

I have experience both kinds of supervisors during the same job that I am still at. The first summer I worked for them we had a manager that wasn’t really involved. I started to work there in May at the beginning of the summer. She spent the time to train me and then only worked three other times that entire summer that I was there. Anytime she would Randomly popping it was mostly to tell us about poor reviews, how we weren’t doing things right, and how we were cleaning things correctly. None of us really wanted to be on shift with her and when you were on shift with her the time and seem to drag on. As a manager you would think that it would be important to make your team feel worthy of being there and encourage them throughout the day. This manager that we had wanted to just correct us instead of encouraging us to do better. Because of this every time we talk to her it was just her telling us everything that we were doing wrong instead of her explaining some thing by saying “you’re doing this but I think that if you did it this way it would help you more.”
The way her tone of voice and demeanor towards us or key indicators of her poor management.

Fast forward to this current summer, a new manager was put into place and things have 100% improved. This manager actually works shifts with us and so she is able to see what things are functioning well and what things need to change. She also works with all of us at some point in the week and is able to see what our weaknesses are and instead of just telling us that we are wrong, she explains to us how we can better improve ourselves and that will also improve our customer service by doing so. Being a good manager doesn’t just fall under what you do while you’re on the job. It also means that you make your employees feel good about themselves and feel good about coming to work. I work at a small local coffee shop and there are about 12 people that work there. Each time I walk into the hut every single person acknowledges that I am there by complementing how I look what I’m wearing or just simply saying hi. All of us are friends outside of the workplace and we know whatever we are feeling sad how to pick each other up. Our manager does a good job with this by sometimes for years flowers or even a cupcake and it makes our whole day better. Being a good manager also includes hiring the right people because I’ve just one person is an a right fit it drags everyone down.

Jenifer Garcia

says:

Hello Jordyn,
Yes, I have definitely had managers that I would dread being scheduled with. I am sorry that you had to endure that, however if you are ever in a supervisory position you have two examples now of what it’s like to be a good manager versus a bad one. I am glad you have a manger now that works on helping you develop versus picking out all the things you are doing wrong. I one-hundred percent agree with you when you said that,” Being a good manager doesn’t just fall under what you do while you’re on the job. It also means that you make your employees feel good about themselves and feel good about coming to work.” This was so beautifully written. Work should not be a drag but should be a joy to go to since we spend a big chunk of our days there so a good manager is definitely one that makes you feel good about going to work.

Christopher Jandric

says:

After watching the video about the Hawthorne effect, it has been in my workplace the entire time and i did not even know about it. Most of my jobs have encountered a Hawthorne effect allowing the person the feel special when doing a certain task. Personally my latest job that i have been working at for 5 summers now, is a mining construction job. Having our supervisor telling certain people to perform these tasks allows for the company to run smoothly. Me being a labour worker with not a lot of heavy duty skills put me under lots of tasks that helped the operators. If it was cleaning up the spots where the machines picked up gravel, dirty, soil or cleaning up the shop. There was no negative environment where i was working as they knew i was starting out and didn’t give me any outrageous tasks. A couple summers after i started operating on the heavy machines, the supervisor trusting me in running them in the yard and work cite. This bringing into the Hawthorne effect with a special task for someone can promote a better performance.

I have been fortunate to not run into a supervisor that has been negative and have bad characteristics. The supervisor that i’ve had for the past 5 summers has been very respected with very little problems. He has been working with the company for over 30 years and was one of the first employees there. He had lots of patience for being a construction supervisor and understood mistakes will happen. All the employees respected him and listened to what he had to say. No talking back or questioning his opinion. He would always listen to other peoples opinions on job production and never reply in a negative format. This to me is a very important characteristic, not always doing it “my way or the highway” allowing for others to take part in the companies production can produce a better work environment. Having managers and supervisors that are respected and listen to others opinions can help a business run smoothly. Lastly, he would bring the crew coffees and donuts at the end of every month that shows his respect back to the employees and gratification. This company is a great company with great supervisors and leaders running it.

Heidi Livengood

says:

Hi Christopher, Great example of how you have seen the Hawthorne Effect play out in your workplace. There are so many ways that workers can be given attention and therefore increase productivity. This study was really truly brilliant in the fact that we could change this to be used in the home as well. Giving workers and children alike, special tasks that will give attention to their unique gifts and talents.

You make a great point about how the best supervisors are those that have been in your position. It helps to build that relationship between worker and supervisor/manager. There is familiarity and they are empathetic towards their employees’ concerns. Respect is a great characteristic as well. All parties need to be respectful of each other to be able to compromise on matters and to foster that sense of belonging. Thank you for sharing!

Abby Amick

says:

I experienced the Hawthorne effect while working for a glass company in Anchorage. I had a job entering data on excel and organizing inventory for the company. I enjoyed this job because my boss handled challenges with optimism, which set the tone for my co-workers and I. Not only this, the positive atmosphere also made it easy to discuss questions or problems with my supervisor and boss. One thing that caught my attention in the Hawthorne Studies video was how businesses were described as social systems, and I found this especially true where I worked. With good management where my co-workers and I were asked if we had ideas on what could be done to improve conditions or operations, it felt like we were a cohesive team. This constructive environment even made things easier when there were disagreements. For example, while I was working, one of my co-workers was upset with the method we were using to input inventory, and he wanted me to make changes to the system. I went to my boss, explained the situation, and we ended up finding a compromise that worked for everyone. I found it was easy to discuss the problem when everyone felt their opinions were heard, along with the sense that we were all on the same team.

Macey Vezina

says:

Hi Abby,
I also felt like having a positive atmosphere in the workplace made it easier to address questions and problems with the higher-ups. I think that having a positive constructive environment makes the workplace flow better and everyone is mostly satisfied. If I have learned something from working with a team, it’s that everyone does things differently and the team just needs to find a way to make things work.

Jessica Boyce

says:

I’m so glad that you experienced positive work while working at the glass company in Anchorage. It sounds like it was a good experience and it’s so nice to have your co-workers all on the same page. That creates such a positive environment and that is the best type of environment to work for.

Brian Farnes

says:

I’ve personally never worked in a position where my production output was measured or tracked in any quantitative way so I can’t say that I have any of that kind of experience with the Hawthorne effect. Probably the closest experience I’ve had with it would have been at a large biotech I worked at in the early 2000s. We had a new director hired into the safety department and when he came onboard he wanted daily updates on what exactly everyone was working on. As a result I know I kept more careful track of my to-do list and made sure I had a few things checked off every day to talk about in the daily update. In this circumstance knowing that I was being observed ensured that I was increasing the quantity of tasks I was accomplishing, but to some extent it came at the expense of working on longer term projects. I don’t know if this level of oversight would have continued or what longer term effects it might have had due to the entire company getting bought out and shut down a few months later.

As for the supervisors I’ve had over the years, I don’t know that I’ve had any that were truly poor, or many who were truly motivating and inspirational, mostly they have all just been pretty decent. Even the bad ones were more just irritating than anything else. The one standout was my first supervisor at my current company. He was a safety professional named Gary who was in his last couple of years before retirement. He was extremely knowledgeable, very friendly and personable, and made sure that his direct reports were taken care of. He understood that I preferred a hands-off style in my supervisors, and would simply assign me an appropriate number of tasks to work on however I wished, and would then be there as a resource when I needed it. He also understood that his way of doings things wasn’t the only way, and that even if I wasn’t accomplishing a task in the same way that he would have, as long as the end result fulfilled the need it was fine. I’ve found that to be a pretty rare trait in a supervisor and it’s something that I try to do for my own direct reports.

Macey Vezina

says:

I experienced the Hawthorne Effect while working as a caregiver at an assisted living facility. We were only allowed to work four 10 hour shifts a week and since it was a state-funded facility, we regularly evaluated our supervisors.

I have seemed to always have jobs with a bad experience with the manager. I had a manager who would never give us requested time off but take those same days off herself. When scheduled with her, she would disappear somewhere else in the store and not come back for 4+ hours, making it impossible for us to take a lunch break during an 8-hour shift. I eventually got fed up but instead of quitting (I really liked interacting with the customers), I told the store director about the issues. We were all interviewed and eventually my manger was too. Instead of it making things worse, she actually asked questions about how she could improve her actions and make it a more positive environment to work in. She would still disappear throughout the day, but I was able to start taking a lunch break. It made our team more positive and we weren’t dreading work. We were able to work more as a team and address issues, instead of holding them in.

Jenifer Garcia

says:

After reviewing the Hawthorne Studies video, for this week’s Class Discussion, what, if any, has been your experience with the Hawthorne effect on a job?
This is the first time I have ever heard of the Hawthorne Studies. I think it is amazing how much the everyday employee is valued now. It is surreal to see this video where Hawthorne is sighted as a progressive company to work for, yet employee only earned one week of vacation time a year, but only after working there for 5. I have experience the Hawthorne effect multiple times and with different employers. The one instance that I can truly remember being valued was my first official job selling merchandise for my local hockey team in California. I constantly ranked highest in merchandise sold and the recognition from my supervisors really helped me feel appreciated. They scheduled me often and really made my input feel valued, because of this I worked even harder to sell more merchandise.

2) Describe a supervisor who was a poor supervisor (un-motivating, indecisive, uncaring, etc.) – what were their characteristics or actions that made you feel that way?
One of my supervisors managed our team so poorly it made the entire work atmosphere incredibly tense and awkward. He always claimed to be an advocate for his employees, however whenever it came time for him to ” go and bat” for his employees our office always seemed to get the lest amount of time-off awards or any type of recognition. Supervisors, at least good ones should always care about the advancement of their employees, however this particular supervisor would always talk us out of doing training that has already been paid for by the company because our job was “much too important” than me or my coworkers getting any type of extra training. All I know is that I had never felt so held back in a position before, and I never want to feel. that way ever again. I know that if I ever lead a team of my own one day, I will take all that I have experienced during my time with this supervisor to ensure I never treat them the way the members in my office were.

Brian Farnes

says:

Hi Jenifer

That feeling you describe of having a supervisor who won’t fight for their team is incredibly frustrating. I’ve been in that position as well, where I had a supervisor who was fine in most regards, but didn’t want to rock the boat with his boss so he wouldn’t argue for promotions or comp for his team. It’s annoying to read through the promotion reports every year and see how many people in other parts of the company are getting promoted while your team is getting left behind. You’re absolutely correct that a supervisor needs to care about the advancement and training of their people, not just how well they look to their superiors.

David Cheek

says:

Everyone needs a bad supervisor to learn from. Whenever you get into a leadership position you will remember that awful supervisor and will try not to do the things that made you feel they were bad. I think I have learned more from my bad supervisor on what not to do than I have from my good ones on what to do when leading. Experiences is what makes us and learning what you can from both types of supervisors will give you the opportunity to be better than them all.

Abby Amick

says:

Jenifer,

I agree that it’s nice to see how much progress has been made to value employees. It was shocking to see the vacation time as one week after 5 years at Hawthorne as well! You make a good example of the Hawthorne effect when you worked harder to sell merchandise because your feedback was respected. It makes sense that a positive environment leads people to work harder when managers value the work, which makes it more meaningful. I’m sorry that you had a bad supervisor who only stood for their image and not for the team. It’s so frustrating to be held back in that way. However, that’s smart to take the experience as a blueprint of what not to do if you lead a team in the future. Thanks for sharing!

Zachary Stallings

says:

My experience with the Hawthorne effect is with the National Guard. Believe it or not your chances of getting promoted with in the guard system is based on how well you are networking and get your name out there with in the guard. So, what I normally see is Leaders or supervisors not doing their job until someone above them is watching and then they turn into superstars. They look good on paper and in the eyes of their supervisors they are great at their jobs but to their subordinates they are horrible.
I had a supervisor who inspired and motivated me but just a horrible supervisor. He was very knowledgeable about how to do his job. However, he was reckless overly cocky and his attitude changed depending on if you were in his “cool guy group” or not. This motivated me and inspired me to be a better leader than he was. So, I took what I could from his guidance and good and bad, practiced the good and remembered but not practiced the bad. Then 6 years later I know currently out rank him in the military

David Cheek

says:

I totally can relate to the military and how productivity changes if leadership is around. One of the downfalls of promotion is that depending on who your direct supervisor is, you may not get graded fairly. Then the individual next to you has a different supervisor and gets graded higher. You both do great work but they get promoted first because of the ranking system.

I feel everyone needs a little horrible supervision in life. This allows people to see things you didn’t like or were uncomfortable with. Hopefully, you’ll have good supervision later and can use all experiences to build your own leadership style.

Manuel Caguiat

says:

After watching the Hawthorne video, i realize something important looking back into my previous jobs. The one job that i could apply this study to is my time in the united states army, 12 years to be exact. My experience in that type of workplace you are not only expected to be proficient at your job, but you are also expected to be proficient of many military tasks and drills, it is crucial for my leaders to be part of the team on our level because they have ability to do so, but not vice versa. During my time in the service i realize now that i was given by my leaders the freedom to do things my way so long as i stayed within the regulations and company policies, and i think that had the Hawthorne effect on me in my opinion.
One of the most influencial boss that i had in the past would have to be my old chief warrant officer. This person had so much confidence in me, even when times that i didn’t have confident in my on ownself. He didn’t question my abilities to figure things out to meet certain deadlines and i was always able to approach him with any advice both technical and as well as personal matters without hesitation. I think that his open mindness and his respectfull and calm demeanor are the few of the many characteristisc that he possessed by i admired and envy the most.

Brett Ferris

says:

Hey Manuel, great post.
Good point in reinforcing the fact that the Hawthorne effect has an impact on everyone in every job. Having a great boss always helps work conditions and confidence is a big factor. Its nice to be influenced by superiors that are very knowledgeable. With the amount of turnover and new bosses one can go through in our military makes seeing the spectrum of management almost in its entirety if that exists.

Brian Farnes

says:

The system seems to be letting me login now and I don’t see my post from yesterday so I’m going to go ahead and post it again.

I’ve personally never worked in a position where my production output was measured or tracked in any quantitative way so I can’t say that I have any of that kind of experience with the Hawthorne effect. Probably the closest experience I’ve had with it would have been at a large biotech I worked at in the early 2000s. We had a new director hired into the safety department and when he came onboard he wanted daily updates on what exactly everyone was working on. As a result I know I kept more careful track of my to-do list and made sure I had a few things checked off every day to talk about in the daily update. In this circumstance knowing that I was being observed ensured that I was increasing the quantity of tasks I was accomplishing, but to some extent it came at the expense of working on longer term projects. I don’t know if this level of oversight would have continued or what longer term effects it might have had due to the entire company getting bought out and shut down a few months later.

As for the supervisors I’ve had over the years, I don’t know that I’ve had any that were truly poor (even the “bad” ones were typically just irritating), or many who were truly motivating and inspirational, mostly they have all just been pretty decent. The one standout was my first supervisor at my current company. He was a safety professional named Gary who was in his last couple of years before retirement. He was extremely knowledgeable, very friendly and personable, and made sure that his direct reports were taken care of. He understood that I preferred a hands-off style in my supervisors, and would simply assign me an appropriate number of tasks to work on however I wished, and would then be there as a resource when I needed it. He also understood that his way of doings things wasn’t the only way, and that even if I wasn’t accomplishing a task in the same way that he would have, as long as the end result fulfilled the need it was fine. I’ve found that to be a pretty rare trait in a supervisor and it’s something that I try to do for my own direct reports.

kenyetta guy

says:

Brian, that’s good that you pretty much had a decent work job and had pretty fair relationships with your leadership. Normally everyone has that one! But good for you.

Manuel Caguiat

says:

Hello Zachary, i can completely understand the experience you had with the national guard, i myself served in the guard for 3 years right after my active duty service, and i can agree with you with 100 percent certainty when it comes to the saying its not what you know, but its who you know when it comes to promotion within the national guard. I wont get into details but i experienced it myself personally. I have had good nco’s buy unfortunately more bad nco’s, and like you said retain the good practice and dispose off the bad. That is one clever approach to not become a toxic leader. Thank you so much for your post.

David Cheek

says:

David Cheek Post

The Hawthorne studies basically made changes to work environments and observed the outcome. They found that whether good or bad changes were made that productivity increased. Basically, the workers productivity increased because they were receiving attention. I have had two jobs my adult life, the military and working for an oil service company. Bootcamp would be a good example of how everyone received attention. Everyone got thrashed individually and as a group. This made us try harder to exceed standards and be the best. It also created a sense of camaraderie because we all went through the same struggles.

Coming from the Marine Corps, I am used to supervisors who are loud and sometimes cannot keep their cool like they should. They were taught differently about how to make things happen. Now I am a civilian and am seeing how the other side leads. It is different for supervisors because the workers were not trained into the culture of the company as much as military members are. My current supervisor is the best I have had. He makes the best decision for the business but also considers what the employees want. There have been a few times where people want to make higher education a goal and he has moved schedules around to allow them time to complete their course loads. He fills you need to train the future leaders of the business and allows employees the opportunity to prove themselves. The way he speaks to everyone with respect and listens to them is one of the reasons why I have more respect for him than past supervisors.

Bryan Kyes

says:

The fire service is going through this culture change you are talking about. It use to be very militaristic but they have been learning they are actually getting more camaraderie out their department personnel by being professional with them instead of yelling. We are still a young culture and we are learning what works best. It takes time for things to change, especially in places that have strong traditions like the military and the fire service. I think we will even see this change start to occur in the military eventually.

kenyetta guy

says:

I would say that I do believe that I have experienced the Hawthorne effect when working at Marshall’s I know that they would want us at the time to push the TJX Rewards Cards and compete amongst other stores to get the most within the quarter or the month I cannot recall and that the regional manager would be coming in so to push the sales. My best supervisors were in the Military I’ve had some that genuinely wanted to see you improve. I’ve also had a supervisor that could careless and wanted to ride off your accomplishments to make himself improve and only looked out for himself and would leave you out to hang if things hit the fan. It taught me that that is never the leader I would want to be I want to make sure I have great relationships with my people under me and I will always check in to see how they are feeling and if I could help accommodate them in anyway.

Bryan Kyes

says:

The best supervisor I ever had was a student lieutenant at the University Fire Dept. He was the only person in a supervisory position who did the cleanups with us, woke up before all of us and started washing the fire engines and apparatus. Because of this he quickly earned our respect and we also did not want to let him down. He would ask us our opinion on things at the department and if there was anything we wanted changed. We had an issue later with people being treated poorly and he was the only person that people felt they could go to with their issues. I have a lot of respect for the guy still even though he moved to the lower 48 and we still keep in touch. This pretty much goes hand in hand with what the Hawthorne video described.
On the other hand I had a supervisor at my EMT job before I moved to Alaska. I hated him and actually went out of my way to watch my back because of the guy, and write down the ridiculous things he did. I moved from a station in another city to my hometown of which we had just won a bid to take over the current EMS contract. On day one there was an incident out of my control which he blamed on me, telling me I was to call him every morning to let him know it wasn’t going to happen again. This was some serious micromanagement, and it pissed me off he didn’t give me any chance to redeem myself and immediately thought I couldn’t be trusted. We also had a horrific call where a baby died and we helped with CPR at the hospital; he called us to ask why we hadn’t cleared in less than 20 minutes while the firefighters on the call were told to take the rest of the day off. This showed he didn’t care at all about us. He then started intentionally trying to get me in trouble because I refused to put up with his micromanaging, so I started recording his phone calls to me. He tried to get me in trouble again and I told him he was lying to his face and that I had the recording to prove it. I showed it to him and the first thing he said was “IT’S ILLEGAL TO RECORD ME.” I told him that while it was admissible in a court, I still thought our bosses would find it interesting. He left me alone from then on, but it was the worst experience I have had on the job. He basically did the opposite of the Hawthorne video so I have to agree with the video from my experiences.

Josh Peterson

says:

I’ve always admired the camaraderie that fire fighters seem to develop with each other. I also like what you said about a leader earning your respect and that causing you to want to work hard for him. I think that servant leadership is one of the most effective styles. Great post.

Mindy Wolfe

says:

Bryan,
It takes a great supervisor to work with their workers even for the minimal tasks. It shows that they know the job and they are not afraid to work too. Their goal is the same as yours.

Micromanagement is a tricky thing. Many people believe that it promotes efficiency and guarantees hard work completed on time. It makes workers feel inferior and childlike. It creates a hostile environment and breaks bonds of trust and communication.

Josh Peterson

says:

1. The person (leader) who inspired me most was my high school hockey coach. It’s difficult to describe what specific actions he took that made him such a good leader. I feel that it was the matter in which he conducted himself. He had the highest expectations of his players, but he led by example. Competitive spirit and professionalism were the standards by which he coached, and he demanded them from his players. Once I applied to aspects outside of hockey, I became a fantastic student and worker. Furthermore, he assimilated with the team, and everyone knew he genuinely loved and cared for all of his players.
2. The managers that I have worked for in the past that were awful all shared similar characteristics. They took no personal responsibility for wrongdoings. It was always someone else’s fault. They didn’t care whatsoever about their subordinates. I have gone over direct supervisors to the head of the company because one of the managers verbally berated my coworker to the point of tears. I think that the Hawthorne videos are accurate in that if you take care of your people the work will take care of itself.

Mindy Wolfe

says:

I have observed everyone working diligently, scurrying around quickly and efficiently, when the hospital commander is making rounds through our clinic. This is the only time you do not see the Facebook app open on computer screens. Employees catch wind that the command group is coming and like clockwork, everyone’s attitude and work ethic changes as quickly as the computer screens. This effect is like the effect observed when your facility is in the period for Joint Commission inspections.
The best supervisor I had was my nursing supervisor in the prison. He was supportive and motivated us to do our best and work towards a goal every day. He gave me confidence to return to school. Here I am.
The worst supervisor I had was a female that wanted the title but not the role of a supervisor. She tried to be everyone’s friend. She never addressed any problems or complaints head on. She did not support a useful program called TeamSTEPPS. She liked to withhold information from staff and considered this “need-to-know” rather than promoting transparency and trust. I felt like I had to keep my head down and work hard but watch my back at the same time.

Shayla Sackinger

says:

I have only kind of experienced the Hawthorne effect at 2 of my 5 jobs. One was when I was a supervisor in the laundry room for the princess hotel and let me tell you, it was a meat grinder. It was hard work and if people did not do their part, then it piled up fast. A common occurrence was the housekeepers were not throwing dirty laundry down the shoots after they cleaned a room, they would hang on to it until they cleaned all their assigned rooms. Because of that, the laundry room did not get anything to wash and then that resulted in the house keepers not getting clean laundry to put in the rooms. This caused lots of drama and arguing. However I was able to talk with the other managers in housekeeping and with their help we were able to work out a better system to where we could get through our 8 hour day without a laundry shortage and without arguments. This is the only time that I have had managers actually listen to some degree and help change things. I also work alongside my Dad at his drive-up and we have such a similar way of thinking and doing things that there are almost no problems, but he is always willing to listen if I, or another employee, have a problem with something.
My current job at eCampus has so far been the only job I look forward to doing every day. As an artist I have always wanted an art job, I just did not think I would be able to get one before I graduate in December. The thing that sticks out is the open communication, from the get-go my supervisor has been getting my input on projects first before she gives hers, and then the final product is a mix of both of our ideas. She also provides critique similar in the way you would in a Uaf art class, not too brutal but still pointing out where to improve. I have learned so much from her and other coworkers at eCampus about graphic art in the last 5 months (gosh its been that long already??), from text and flier layouts to how to make that darn course schedule look pretty, and overall it has helped my art outside of work too. She is also just a good person overall and does not hesitate to answer any of my questions and bother the higherups if she does not know. Good supervisors are hard to come by, and I am so grateful to have a good one for my first official art job (I’m not sure what I’d do if I had a horrible supervisor for art, there’d probably be a lot of bickering…).

Maria Heskett

says:

I drove a truck for 6 years over the road and even had my own company going, as a owner-operator. I dealt with my fair share of really bad driver managers but John, really helped me in many ways. He took up a parental style of management with me. He had expectations and demanded nothing less than the standard. In turn, he listened to what i had to say and got my loads to where i wanted to go. This transactional/ parental relationship helped me to perform better, along with his respect of my needs.
A poor Supervisor that i have had was out of an electrical warehouse. His goal was to just do his job and go home. This caused the culture of the workplace, to turn into a roughneck atmosphere. He failed to employees that were bullying others and violent. The building was old and had poor ventilation. Overall, i felt really poorly about working there. The characteristics of the management, felt like the organization did not seem to care for their employees.

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